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5 Keys to Successful Selling for the First-Time Sales Rep

There’s no such thing as a born salesperson. Great sales reps make it look easy, but superior performance usually indicates that a salesperson has taken the time to hone their skills and is constantly iterating to better help their prospects.

Whether you’re a first-time rep or looking to get back to the basics, these five tips are the essential pillars of successful selling.

How to Be a Good Sales Rep and Successfully Sell

1. Start with your goals.

If you’re learning to sell, start from the end and work backwards. Knowing your goals and measuring your performance against them (more on that later) is the most important place to start.

How many customers do you or your company need, and in what time frame? How many leads do you need to close that many customers? How many connections do you need to generate that many opportunities? And so on. Multiply your customer goal by the average sale price of your company’s product to get the amount of revenue you should be aiming for.

Make sure you set personal sales goals as well. You can always tell when a salesperson is in the top 2% of their organization. They command attention, work at their craft, provide a consistent experience, and execute. These behaviors and actions typically precede results.

Aim to be in the top 2% of your organization. It won’t happen tomorrow, and it won’t be easy, but always strive for the top.

2. Recognize that sales is a process.

Sales is not an art. Sales is a science and a technology.

HubSpot VP of Sales Pete Caputa and Harvard Business School professor and former HubSpot CRO Mark Roberge are some of the most successful sales executives I know. They’re scientists, and they excel at making the classic sales process scalable. If you’re not looking at sales as a process, you’re missing the boat.

Sales is changing rapidly, but some things will always be the same. To get customers, you’ll have to establish their needs and interest in your product, address inertia in their business, and determine a timeline to sell.

The way your company moves through the funnel, however, will be unique. If you treat every sales process the same, you could easily miss something. Understand that every business has its own playbook for a reason. So before you ever get on the phone with a prospect, sit with your managers to thoroughly understand your company’s process.

This will include learning how to position your product, gaining strategies for speaking with prospects, understanding your key value propositions, and discovering what your ideal customer looks like, just to name a few factors of any successful sales process.

3. Identify business pain.

You must be able to identify your prospects’ business pain and distinguish it from their run of the mill business problems. If a step of their process is a slight annoyance, who cares?

Pain isn’t getting a cut on your arm -- pain is your leg falling off. A true business pain is discussed every day in the executive office and the boardroom. Someone has probably set aside budget to solve it. If it’s a critical factor to their business’ success, you’ve discovered a real business pain.

As a sales rep, you need to build trust with your prospects. Buyers need confidence that you understand their problem and have the resources to solve it. But your relationship doesn’t end after the sale -- you are ethically required to live up to your promise. Prepare your prospects for the transition to your product and give them all the help they need, and you’ll have a happy customer on your hands.

4. Measure every step.

Anything worth doing is worth measuring, and anything that can be measured can be improved.

Remember when you set your goals? Be fanatical about measuring your performance against them. At the rate you’re selling today, will you hit your numbers by the end of the month? Are your closing strategies converting prospects to customers? If not, change something up.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to reach your numbers this month. If you measure everything you do, you’ll be able to solve problems as they arise.

In this day and age, there are boatloads of coaching resources. A simple Google search for an area in which you’re struggling will return a huge amount of material that can help you. Your managers will be more than happy to help you as well, especially if you’re asking for assistance before it’s too late.

5. Sell to people who want to buy.

This principle is at the heart of the inbound sales methodology.

In the early days of my career, I spent a lot of time reaching out to people who didn’t want to talk to me. But for the last seven years, I’ve spent more time connecting with people who want to hear what I have to say.

That’s the power of inbound marketing. By creating or curating high-quality and helpful content and letting prospects come to you, you’ll save time and increase your probability of closing sales.

So there you have it: My top five tips on selling for the first time. What are your best tips for successful selling? Let us know in the comments below.

Editor's note: This post was originally published in June 2015 and has been updated for comprehensiveness and accuracy.

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