9 Ways to Improve Customer Retention and Loyalty

customer-retention-and-loyalty

By now, you probably already know that the key to business and revenue growth isn't just bringing in new customers.

It's about retaining the customers you have, too.

Bain & Company research found that increasing customer retention rate by just 5% can increase profits by 25-95%. And when acquiring a new customer can be 5-25X more expensive than retaining an existing one, it's absolutely imperative to invest just as much time and resources in retaining existing customers as in closing new ones -- and maybe even more.

Read this blog post to learn how to calculate your customer retention rate -- and then, how to use these strategies for improving it.

Once you know your customer retention rate, you should consider doing an audit of your lost customers to determine similarities in reasons for leaving, or types of customers that churn. Consider if you can add more qualifying questions to your sales process or revise your buyer persona to better reflect the attributes of loyal, returning customers.

9 Strategies to Improve Customer Retention and Loyalty

1. Highlight case studies during the sales process.

A significant portion of the sales process should be focused on determining if your product or service is the right fit -- from both a relationship standpoint and how you will work together.

Share case studies that show exactly how your product or services helped other customers -- and how they felt about working with your team. You could also share testimonials from previous customers.

It's similar to researching before any big buying decision. You want to know if and how it will work before you purchase. If the customer truly understands this, they will be more likely to have properly set expectations and be happier with the experience once they sign on the dotted line.

2. Set expectations early and often.

If you don’t set expectations and communicate these clearly, customers can easily become upset. They might believe you can immediately deliver on X results, while in reality, those results are only seen after months of investing time and resources.

Understanding these points of view and communicating progress toward goals, what’s included in purchases, your communication style, etc., is essential for making sure expectations are met. This, in turn, will keep customers happy with the relationship for longer.

3. Communicate results on a regular basis.

Customers are more likely to continue purchasing from you if your product or service is delivering results and ROI. If a customer can point to the fact that your product has influenced their goals and results, then it will be much more difficult for the customer to churn and say goodbye.

That means you need a good system for tracking and reporting on the metrics that really matter to the customer, which should relate to the goals you established together. Be transparent about the results you've seen, where you see opportunities for improvements, and what you will work on next month.

4. Create a roadmap for the future of the relationship.

Many people compare the customer-customer success manager (CSM) relationship to dating -- and this isn’t that far off. And it’s especially true when you consider the lifecycle of dating. At some point, one person in the relationship wants to know that this is “going somewhere.” He or she wants to know what the “plan” for the future looks like.

This desire to know that you are working toward a “next step” can also be applied to business relationships.

CSMs should create and revise on a regular basis a relationship roadmap. Build in steps for new milestones and goals. Both parties should be able to look forward and be excited about the current and next stage of the relationship.

5. Make memories around your shared successes.

According to research, people remember negative events more vividly than positive ones. Even if there are more positive events overall, the bad occurrences may be the longest lasting memories.

So CSMs need to consider how they can create better, more memorable experiences around positives and successes. When something negative occurs -- if there's a product outage, or a goal is missed for example -- you overly communicates, discusses plans for fixing the issue, apologizes, etc. But when something truly great happens, how much of an emphasis do you place on the event?

6. Ask for feedback and act on this information.

You can’t improve customer retention without first understanding why your customers churn. Once you know the reasons and the correlating signs, you can work to prevent and reduce customer churn by proactively dealing with issues.

Ask for regular customer feedback from the entire team, including the decision-maker. Being able to identify and address these issues as early as possible will help you to prevent customers from leaving you. Whether you use a customer survey in an email, after a transaction, or one-off, surveying customers and doing it regularly will help you identify trends and proactively solve problems -- before customers leave you for your competitors.

7. Map out a consistent customer experience.

Consistency builds trust with customers. They know what to expect, and can rely on you to get the work done and help deliver the results they need.

Without this, most interactions are a surprise, and in reality, nobody really likes surprises in a business setting.

Build out processes for onboarding new customers and kickoff phone calls and meetings. Make your web assets and social media channels consistent so customers can get the help they need across a variety of channels. And plan out a schedule for future check-ins and milestones so you both have your eye on the same goals and shared responsibilities.

Having a process for each of these activities will make you more efficient, and the customer will have insight into what needs to be done and when. You can save the surprises for when you share the great results of the project.

8. Keep a record of communication and any past problems.

Your company's culture, leadership, and business practices all contribute to retention, but another way to prevent disruption in changes in personnel is by adopting a CRM system where you can store notes from meetings and phone calls, ongoing issues, personal preferences of the customers, etc.

With detailed notes and a complete history of the relationship recorded, a new account manager or point of contact will be ready to be a true business partner for you much more quickly -- or vice versa, on the customer's side.

9. Use reciprocity to increase loyalty.

Reciprocity is a social construct that has been found to increase loyalty. Acts of kindness create a feeling of obligation in the person who instinctively wants to repay the kindness.

There are two kinds of reciprocity: surprise and trumpeted. Both of these can be used in customer service to increase loyalty.

Surprise reciprocity is a surprise gift or gesture. An example of this would be when you send your customer free swag or tickets to a company event without warning.

Trumpeted reciprocity is when the person giving or doing something beneficial does so in a way that reveals that they are going above and beyond. It doesn’t mean you document and put all the great things you do in a monthly report, but it is obvious to the customer that what you are doing is outside the normal scope of the working relationship. An example of this would be giving your customer early access to a new product or feature.

What are your strategies for improving customer retention? Share them with me on Twitter.

New Call-to-action