cocktail-hourAre you dreaming of your new iPad? Are you currently in Austin attending SXSW ’12? Are you pinning in another browser window? Whatever your answers to those are, I’m sure you’re seeing a fair amount of your social media real estate being taken up by them (for me, it’s “No,” “No” and “Likely”). Your attention may be somewhat diverted by them, but here’s some other great pieces floating around in cyberspace this week:

3 Simple Storytelling Methods That Can Do Your Selling For You (Copyblogger): Especially with Facebook brand timelines rolling out, storytelling is becoming more important than ever. Making sure to create a memorable experience for users in a more subtle way is a growing trend, and it’s resulting in some stunning creative campaigns. How are you incorporating this into your marketing?

Why Influencer Marketing Isn’t About the “Influencers” (Ad Age): There are the people you know online, and then there are the people you know of online. You may not interact daily with these people, but you know that their voice has a lot more weight than the average bear. But how much trust can you place in them? Do you value a recommendation from someone you know or someone who’s the loudest? Has the true role of the influencer shifted?

Lessons for Social Media Campaigners Learned from the Backlash Against KONY 2012 (Social Media Today): If you haven’t already seen the KONY 2012 video, take 30 minutes to watch it. There’s no denying that the video is heart-wrenching, and seeks to make the general population aware of atrocities going on in Africa. However, after the video was released, users dug a little deeper into Invisible Children, the organization behind the video, and saw that what they were advocating perhaps isn’t the best plan of action for the region. In any case, it’s a valuable lesson in crisis management: Do you have any weaknesses in your armor? What will you do if people find fault in your campaign?

Facebook is the Secret to Motivating Millenial Workers (AllFacebook): You’ve seen the arguments both praising and vilifying millenials, but the fact is, they are a force. And soon to be a major part of the workforce. When hiring members of the younger generation, it’s necessary to be where they are, connecting with them, becoming part of their culture. Where is this? On Facebook, of course. Facebook is almost truly the be-all, end-all of life moments (just look at Timeline). How many times have you heard (or said), “It’s not official unless it’s on Facebook”?

Taco Bell’s Doritos Locos Tacos Arrive With TV Spots, Augmented Reality Twitter (BrandChannel): Say what you want about Taco Bell and its food, but you can’t deny that people LOVE it. Couple a Taco Bell product with Doritos, a company that asks its fans to produce their own Super Bowl commercials (and actually airs the best one), and you wonder why this hasn’t happened before. How are these brands cultivating such a loyal fan base? What makes someone drive 965 miles for a taco? Is someone willing to do that for your brand?

I must also admit that I had two Doritos Locos Tacos just before writing this. And they were delicious.

What have you been reading?

Originally published Mar 9, 2012 1:00:14 AM, updated June 28 2019

Topics:

Social Media Branding Crisis Management