<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1657797781133784&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

10 Tried-and-True Tips for Sales and Marketing Alignment

Sales_and_Marketing_Alignment.jpg

My interest in smarketing best practices started when our Latin American sales team grew a ton in just a few weeks. Suddenly, communication between Sales and Marketing was much harder to get right. When we were a smaller team, I could meet 1:1 with each salesperson and talk about how we could help generate more (and better) leads ... but that wasn't scalable as we grew.

I needed help. To learn what other marketers were doing to work efficiently with their sales teams, I scheduled meetings with several members of our field and channel marketing team.New Call-to-action

Turns out, each marketer I spoke with had great advice and processes to better work with Sales ... but none of them had the same advice and process. To help share the information across our team and with anyone else new to sales and marketing alignment, I decided to compile everyone's best practices into a blog post. 

So here it is: The best smarketing tips and tricks that my colleagues swear by.

10 Tried & True Smarketing Best Practices

1) Meet regularly.

Have an onboarding smarketing meeting with every new salesperson. 

In order to support Sales successfully, it is very important to share processes, resources, and best practices from the start. Use this time to get to know each other and share how Marketing will be supporting the sales team. If you have a large number of salespeople starting, hold a monthly meeting to set these expectations and field any questions new folks might have.

Attend sales weekly meetings. 

Attending weekly sales meetings allows marketers to know how Sales is doing with their quota and goals, and offer support when needed. Use this time to share the upcoming campaigns, content, and offers that Marketing will be promoting that week. Also ask for content ideas and recommendations for your future offers and blog posts.

Have a monthly meeting with sales managers. 

Marketing and sales managers should meet on a monthly basis to analyze results and evaluate their SLA. Important metrics to share are lead generation, MQLs, percent of leads worked, and lead-to-customer conversion rate. 

Attend events together.

Whether it's an industry meetup group, happy hour in your office, or an organized conference -- spend time together in a casual setting. Attending an event together provides you with a unique opportunity to get to know your Sales department outside of the traditional work environment. 

2) Create a team email alias. 

Have an email alias that gets sent to both the sales and marketing teams. Use this strategically to share important information in both directions.

3) Have a content creation process in place.

Your sales reps are talking with prospects all the time and know what is getting them excited about your company. The problem is that a lot of times they don't have time to write down this feedback. How can you help? Make sure to put together a process to gather this input.

Hold brainstorm sessions at weekly meetings.

Have a five-minute brainstorm session at a sales meeting to ask what content they would like to have to share with prospects or attract more leads.

Use a shared Google document to collect ideas and references.

Have a shared Google spreadsheet where Sales can add ideas or certain references for content creation.

4) Coordinate your content marketing campaigns with Sales. 

Marketers are constantly promoting new offers and content, so it's important to keep the sales team up-to-date with these promotions so they know what recent offer their leads are receiving. 

Here are the basic steps for coordinating your offers with Sales:

a. Include your promotion on a shared calendar. 

Build a Google Calendar and add the date and time of your promotion (it might be an email, webinar, or social media campaign) along with the URL, the main talking points, and description of each offer. Make sure to invite your sales team to this calendar so they can see it on their personal accounts.

b. Email the offer to Sales.

Once your offer has been promoted and you start getting leads, you should email the sales team with the following information:

  • Offer talking points. Include two to three bullets about the offer. Assume the salesperson hasn't read the offer -- what main concepts should they know when talking to prospects? Good talking points usually include: stats, business use cases, or "how to" advice.
  • Lead views. Make sure to include the list of the leads your offer is generating so Sales can take action. If you have a CRM, you can easily generate views and share them with your sales team.
  • A quote of the week. Similar to the talking points, including a more general quote that Sales can use on their calls can keep the conversations up-to-date. The best quotes are the ones that are data-driven and relevant, so try to include a recent industry trend or stat.

c. Build follow-up email templates for your promotions. 

Offers are a great way to generate new leads and re-engage old leads. Build email templates for your sales team to start a conversation. This email should be specific about the offer and how your company might help with the prospect's interest. 

5) Help showcase your salesperson's expertise.

Ghostwrite a blog post under your salesperson's name.

Consider ghostwriting a post under your salesperson's name. Interview them on the topic, transcribe your conversation, and turn that into a blog post. This can help the salesperson establish credibility and familiarity with their leads.

Get them to use social media.

If your salesperson is active on social media, then encourage them to share your company's content. You can even write some lazy social media messages for them, so all they have to do is copy and paste them on their favorite networks. 

6) Make yourself (or another marketer) available for calls.

On calls, you can be very helpful by illustrating the business use of your product or service. So make sure you're blocking off time every week -- especially at the end of the month and the quarter -- to jump on calls. 

7) Listen to calls.

Also take some time to sit next to your sales team and listen to their calls. This is a great learning experience that will help you get ideas for future content creation and how to build some of the follow-up emails of your offers.

8) Facilitate training if needed.

We all know our sales teams are experts in doing product demos, but sometimes there are specific use cases where they might feel they need assistance. Ask your team regularly if they have had some trouble with specific questions during their calls and facilitate training if necessary.

9) Organize sales enablement resources in one easy-to-access location.

Marketers work hard to create sales enablement resources such as brochures, company overviews, or presentations, but all that hard work goes to waste if your sales team can't find (and use) them. 

So try to keep all your sales enablement resources in one shared place where Sales can easily access them. This location is a great place to host your campaign calendar, links to relevant offers, and specific content for a market or persona. 

10) Have fun and get to know each other.

Finally, some of the most important advice is to try to get to know each other as people. Organize lunches, outings, and celebrations, and just have fun. This helps build trust among team members and ensures that people feel comfortable leaning on each other for support.

Need help coming up with an outing idea? Check out this list of 17 fun ideas -- from improv workshops to karaoke.

Editor's Note: This post was originally published in October 2015 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

get a free inbound marketing assessment

Enjoy this article? Don't forget to share.